Climb Mt. Fuji - My Tokyo Guide - Mount Fuji off season climbs

  • Mt. Fuji Guides

    Your Mt. Fuji expedition will be lead by local Mt. Fuji Climbing experts. All guides are highly qualified and have years of climbing experience. All guides are not only fluent in English but also in Japanese as well to remedy any concerns you may have.

     

    Richard - Head Guide

    Interview 2In 2008, Richard our head guide (seen left) started working as a professional Mt. Fuji Guide. A highlight occurred when he appeared in a television segment called, Japan's 100 Most Famous Mountains as a professional Mt. Fuji Guide on Japan's national Broadcasting Channel (NHK). Richard has witnessed his fair share of mishaps on Mt. Fuji. Many that could have been prevented with a little pre-climb planning. So in 2013, Richard published "Climbing Mt. Fuji "A Complete Guidebook" This guidebook is dedicated to help future Mt. Fuji Climbers in planning and preparing a successful Mt. Fuji climb and provide climbers with useful and possibly lifesaving information. The guidebook provides that trustworthy reference, because it was written by an offical Mt. Fuji Guide who has years of climbing experince and every imaginable type of Mt. Fuji climb under his belt.

     

    Yosuke - Bilingual Guide

    YosukeYosuke graduated from the University of Alaska Southeast Outdoor Skills and Leadership program and work several years as an Alaska guide before returning home to Japan. Yosuke was born and raised in Fujinomiya city, so Mt. Fuji is his backyard. He is a local guide that knows Mt. Fuji like the back of his hand.

     

    Aki - Bilingual Guide

    AkiAki has been guiding Mt. Fuji climbs since 2008, he has climb Mt. Fuji over 400 times, and has trek all four-summit routes; and complete countless one-day, night and numerous pilgrim climbs from the base of Mt. Fuji. For the past 4 winters Aki has worked in northern Canada (Yellow Knife) as an aurora borealis (Northern Lights) Guide.

    Taishi - Bilingual Guide

    Taishi

    Taishi is fluent in both English and Japanese and Graduated from University of Central Oklahoma in 2008. Taishi is a proficient climber and has over 200 Mt. Fuji climbs under his belt. He also worked 3 summers at a mountain hut on the Fujinomiya route before becoming a Mt. Fuji for guide, so he is well appreciated within the Mt. Fuji community. He is also a freelance photographer when he is not climbing Mt. Fuji.

    What do our customers say?

    “The greatest fear on taking on any endeavor is the unknown. Having the knowledge of a professional guide from My Tokyo Guide made all the different in the world!” - Sheila Soukup - Mt. Fuji Climbing Client

    A Happy Customer
     

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    • Mt. Fuji Off-Season Climbs

      Off-Season Climbs


      Slight Off-Season Climbs: (June, September and October)
      Climbing in the months just before and just after the climbing season I.e. (June, September and October) is actually preferred by some hikers who like to avoid the crowds. The weather varies depending on the month, but for the most part the weather is not so different from the weather during the climbing season. There are some mountain huts that remain open, however all other toilets and safety facilities are shut. (As all signposts are removed in the off-season recommend climbing with a mountain guide)

      Deep off-Season Climbs: (April, May and November)
      During these months, the weather can be very unforgiving; and as there are no mountain huts open during this time your only option is a 1-day climb. If you climb in April or May you will defiantly need crampons. (Of these months, May is your best weather choice for doing a 1-day climb) As the mountain is typically covered in snow climbing with a mountain guide is a must and you should never climb alone.)

      Winter off-Season Climbs: (December, January, February, March)
      Due to the extreme climate, (horrendous winds, subzero temperatures) this is the most dangerous time to climb Mt. Fuji and accordingly produces the most fatalities of all the seasons. The icy slopes, horrendous winds and subzero temperatures enhances the climb dangers by ten folds. I would unequivocally avoid climbing Mt. Fuji during the winter months.

    • Off-Season Climbs

      Climbing Mt. Fuji in the off-season can be an extremely peaceful experience as the trails and most of the mountain huts are completely deserted.

      Off-Season Climbs Dates

      Slight Off-Season Climbs: (June, September and October)
      Climbing in the months just before and just after the climbing season I.e. (June, September and October) is actually preferred by some hikers who like to avoid the crowds. The weather varies depending on the month, but for the most part the weather is not so different from the weather during the climbing season. There are some mountain huts that remain open, however all other toilets and safety facilities are shut. (As all signposts are removed in the off-season recommend climbing with a mountain guide)

      Deep off-Season Climbs: (April, May and November)
      During these months, the weather can be very unforgiving; and as there are no mountain huts open during this time your only option is a 1-day climb. If you climb in April or May you will defiantly need crampons. (Of these months, May is your best weather choice for doing a 1-day climb) As the mountain is typically covered in snow climbing with a mountain guide is a must and you should never climb alone.)

      Winter off-Season Climbs: (December, January, February, March)
      Due to the extreme climate, (horrendous winds, subzero temperatures) this is the most dangerous time to climb Mt. Fuji and accordingly produces the most fatalities of all the seasons. The icy slopes, horrendous winds and subzero temperatures enhances the climb dangers by ten folds. I would unequivocally avoid climbing Mt. Fuji during the winter months.